Director: Iliyasu Abdulmumini Tantiri
Producer: Naziru Dan Hajiya
Story: Iliyasu Abdulmumini Tantiri
Language: Hausa
Year: 2016
Company: Kumo Production

Introduction

The Hijra (migration/exodus) of the Prophet Muhammad (SAW) and his companions from Makkah to Madinah is an epoch in the history of Islam. It is featured notably in the Qur’an and the Sunnah of the Prophet. Although the Prophet was born and raised in Makkah and had preached for many years there, persecution forced him along with the few that believed him to migrate. The Islamic Hijri calendar began from that time. The choice of the title for the film cannot be unconnected to the Prophet’s Hijra.

Oftentimes, the bond between cinema and the orthodox religious and cultural institutions is marked by disquiet. Many people reject film, seeing it as a subtle way to debase their religion and culture. Presentations of bedroom scene, or virtually anything denoting sex or other tabooed subjects, for instance, are still frown at in Kannywood. Several filmmakers are, therefore, relentless in their efforts to counter this argument, to correct the (mis)conception. Some have gone far and recently adapted the famous story of As-Habul Kahfi (The Seven Sleepers) from the Qur’an. There are quite a number of other films meant for Islamic evangelism. The epic drama, Hijira is arguably one of such.

Plot Summary
The film is a mixture of a quite romantic comedy and adventure. It begins from a scene of mass burial of the victims of an infectious plague that ravages the village of Madaci. As they bury some corpses, more are brought forward. The King calls for an emergency meeting. There is disagreement as to whether to stay in the town or leave. The Chief Imam is of the opinion that everyone should remain, basing his point with the Islamic injunction that says when there is a an outbreak of plague in a land, nobody should enter it; and if the plague breaks out in a place one lives in, do not leave. The King accepted this, thus goes, along with other chiefs, to address the townspeople.

While addressing the townspeople, a member of the village, Bala comes with a sad story that the plague has finished ravaging the neighboring villages and has spread to Madaci. Asked how he came to know about that, he said he is from there and has seen corpses all around. He is thus instructed to stay back; he refuses. The Sarkin Yaki (i.e. Chief Guard) kills him. The remains of Bala is said to be very deadly as it should not be touched by anyone, and its decomposition will equally harm all. The King, therefore, has a quick change of mind and, there and then, declares the start of the exodus.

The execution of Bala is a can of worms. His mother vows to avenge him by imploring his choleric brother, Zubabu to slay Sarkin Yaki whenever and however he gets a chance. Other conflicts include the thievish and snobbish nature of the Prince; the love triangle between Rabo and Chiko where both love Saratu, a beautiful girl who is betrothed to the latter. An acerbic, old man called Baba Manga, on the other side, openly objects the exodus and fearlessly criticizes the King.

As the migration begins, mistrust, rancor, conflict, artificial and natural disasters envelop the migrants. A group of bandits launches a fatal attack on them. Chiko murders Rabo. Saratu avenges her heartthrob by getting married to Chiko only to stab him to death on their first night. The Prince poisons the King, takes charge and sacks Sarkin Yaki. Zubabu challenges Sarkin Yaki in a physical combat and loses. Terrible epidemic and deadly spirits descend on the other migrants, and kill many. Gambo, the town’s physician tries his best possible but to no avail. Finally, the remaining few reach a town but its border guards deny them entry. Famine and wild animals devour them, including the Sarkin Yaki. Only a single child, the narrator of the story, survived.

Critique
The star-studded film, Hijira was apparently a big project, planned in a span of months or more, and carefully directed and produced. The casting largely fits, the narrative sequentially connected, the mise en scene presented well, and so on and so forth. The filmmakers and the actors of Hijira can’t be easily forgotten in the film industry. As with any film, nay, everything else, Hijira has some imperfections.

For instance, the story is told through an omniscient point of view, but in the end a narrator (a different point of view called restricted) is introduced. The narrator should have said at least a line from the beginning, to let spectators know that the film is actually a narration. Likewise, the makeup and the special effects leave much to be desired. First, you cannot have all the victims of a war with wounds on their neck or head only and no any other part of their bodies. Second, the scene where some spirits descend on the migrants looks so much artificial.

Other contextual mistakes include the mass grave scene. The people burying the dead use their bare hands. The least experienced person knows that the remains of the victims of any contagious disease are not touched with uncovered hands. This, even in the film, is soon contradicted as the Madaci townspeople are cautioned to not have any body contact with anyone infected with the disease. This is, in fact, the reason why they had to migrate, to run as far away as they can from the dead body of Bala.

From the religious perspective, the character of Gambo betrays the possible idea of the film. Doubtless, it is a common practice among the traditional doctors to use incantation and invocation, showing Gambo doing the same is incongruous. His medicine should be Islamic-compliant to corroborate the points already highlighted by the character of the chief imam who uphold the virtues of Muslims.

Verdict
The trio of forced marriage, gender rivalry, and singing and dancing are the usual elements of Kannywood films. Hijira, however, defy this straitjacketing by avoiding all the three, for the aim is to proselytise Islam and to caution the faithful on the adherence to the Prophet’s sayings. There have been similar films before it such as Ga Duhu Ga Haske (dir. Aminu Saira, 2011), Yankin Imani (dir. Imran S.I Ashir, 2013), Ana Muslim (dir. Abubakar S. Shehu, 2014), and, above all, As-Habul Kahf (dir. Aminu Saira, 2013). Yet, none is without song and dance – the practice generally condemned as caricaturing Hindi cinema – as Hijira is. Apparently, both the precepts of Hausa culture and Islam are considered and safeguarded in addition to the film’s being very likely original. Therefore, the few content and technical lapses cannot take away all its other credits. The film is by and large worth your naira. I give it 3.5 out of 5 stars.
Reviewed by:
Muhammad Muhsin Ibrahim,
Dept. of Theatre and Performing Arts
Bayero University, Kano; muhsin2008@gmail.com

From: muhsin.in

Advertisements

One thought on “Movie Review – HIJIRA

  1. What a wonderful submission. However, i need to be educated here you talk about characterization, which has do with how story is been narrated either first person or third person point of view, I though it only apply to prose/fiction. Pls educate me.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s